1 / 1

What Goes into Vitamins and Supplements?

What is my supplement

As you may already know, the supplement industry is not tightly regulated  or scrutinized by a governing body like the food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries. As much as we want to believe everything that we see on a supplement label, it might not accurately reflect what’s actually in the product.

Don’t let this deter you from using supplements and vitamins, though. For the most part, things are moving in the right direction in terms of up-and-coming brands taking the initiative to have their supplements thoroughly tested before being put on store shelves.

Nevertheless, Tru 3rd wants to propel this movement and keep the momentum going by offering affordable, ongoing supplement testing through third-party labs. In the end, we want to help supplement companies display the quality and purity of their products. In turn, this builds trust and confidence with consumers.

Being transparent about what goes into vitamins and supplements is an essential step in taking your supplement brand to the next level.

On that note, have you ever wondered what actually goes into supplements?

Don’t let this deter you from using supplements and vitamins, though. For the most part, things are moving in the right direction in terms of up-and-coming brands taking the initiative to have their supplements thoroughly tested before being put on store shelves.

What Goes Into Supplements?

In 2015, the New York State attorney general issued several cease-and-desist letters to several major retailers in the United States after having an independent third-party lab test their leading herbal supplements.

What was the cause for concern, you ask?

Well, the supplement lab tests showed that roughly 80% of the products contained substances that were different from what the label claimed; thus, they were considered contaminants.

In fact, 45% of the 120 DNA samples from one of the brand’s supplement line contained no plant DNA at all. In other words, nearly half of their tested herbal supplements had no herbal ingredients in them.

So, what did these products actually have in them?

In short: Fillers and binding agents. These are simple ingredients that provide volume and weight to the capsules, without producing any health benefits. For example, the supplement lab tests showed that instead of medicinal herbs, many of the products contained powdered rice, powdered legumes, powdered wheat, and powdered houseplants. Usually, those ingredients are benign and won’t be an issue, but it’s disconcerting for people who have certain food allergies.

For example, if a supplement claims it’s wheat-free, but contains wheat, that could be a serious problem for some people (notably those with celiac disease). The last thing we want is for someone to end up in the hospital over something that they are taking in hopes of improving their health and wellness.

Now, this particular batch of third-party lab tests could have been an anomaly since the sample size of products tested wasn’t big enough to draw any conclusions from. However, it serves as a good example of why independent lab testing is essential for supplement brands, both from a business and consumer standpoint.

Why Perform Third-Party Lab Tests on Supplements?

Our ambition at Tru 3rd Certified is to provide a transparent look at dietary supplements and vitamins so supplement brands can proudly advertise the upstanding quality and purity of products they offer. Having the Tru 3rd Certified emblem on your supplements can help take your brand to the next level by showing consumers you take their health and results seriously.

Blog H2 Heading Title / Download Example
Blog H2 Heading Title

smart

Comments